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Free, connected, and meaningful: free will beliefs promote meaningfulness through belongingness
Moynihan, Andrew B.; Igou, Eric Raymond; van Tilburg, Wijnand A.P.
The full text of this article will not be available in ULIR until the embargo expires on the 17/11/2018 Previous research suggests that belief in free will helps to inhibit anti-social impulses. As a result, belief in free will enables the creation of and participation in society. Consistently, we propose that belief in free will is associated with a sense of belongingness. As previous research indicates that belongingness is a source of meaning in life, we predicted that belief in free will in turn facilitates increased meaningfulness via feelings of belongingness. To test this hypothesis, we conducted two preliminary, small-scale studies and a large-scale study using individual difference data. As expected, in Study 1, the positive association be'tween free will beliefs and meaningfulness was mediated by feelings of belongingness. In Study 2, this effect emerged using alternative measures of free will belief and belongingness, adding to the findings' reliability and validity. In Study 3, these effects were again replicated with a large sample of participants using separate and composite measures of free will belief and belongingness. Finally, we conducted multiple group comparisons and meta-analyses. These confirmed that the proposed correlations and indirect effects were significant and consistent across studies. Our findings provide important understandings of the functions and consequences of free will beliefs. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. ACCEPTED peer-reviewed
Keyword(s): LIFE; free will; belongingness; meaning; self-regulation; existential psychology
Publication Date:
2017
Type: Journal article
Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Language(s): English
Institution: University of Limerick
Citation(s): Personality and Individual Differences;107, pp. 54-65
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.11.006
Publisher(s): Elsevier
First Indexed: 2018-03-23 06:25:23 Last Updated: 2018-03-23 06:25:23