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Conical diffraction of linearly polarised light controls the angular position of a microscopic object
LUNNEY, JAMES; DONEGAN, JOHN; RAKOVICH, YURY; PHELAN, CIARAN; BALLANTINE, KYLE
Conical diffraction of linearly polarised light in a biaxial crystal produces a beam with a crescent-shaped intensity profile. Rotation of the plane of polarisation produces the unique effect of spatially moving the crescent-shaped beam around a ring. We use this effect to trap microspheres and white blood cells and to position them at any angular position on the ring. Continuous motion around the circle is also demonstrated. This crescent beam does not require an interferometeric arrangement to form it, nor does it carry optical angular momentum. The ability to spatially locate a beam and an associated trapped object simply by varying the polarisation of light suggests that this optical process should find application in the manipulation and actuation of micro- and nano-scale physical and biological objects. ?2010 Optical Society
Keyword(s): Optics; Diffraction; Nanoscience & Materials
Publication Date:
2010
Type: Journal article
Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Language(s): English
Institution: Trinity College Dublin
Citation(s): D. O'Dwyer, C. F. Phelan, K. E. Ballantine, Y. Rakovich, J. G. Lunney and J. F. Donegan, Conical diffraction of linearly polarised light controls the angular position of a microscopic object, Optics Express, 18, 26, 2010, 27319 - 27326
First Indexed: 2014-05-13 05:27:35 Last Updated: 2017-05-09 06:39:48